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Cats

  • This handout discusses aspergillosis in cats, an infection, growth, or allergic response caused by the Aspergillus fungus. If your cat becomes infected, it can be confined to the nasal passages (nasal aspergillosis), or it can spread throughout the body (systemic aspergillosis). The clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of both conditions are outlined.

  • Aspirin is given by mouth in the form of a tablet, and is primarily used off label as an anti-clotting medication. It also acts as an anti-inflammatory, pain control, and fever-reducing medication. The most common side effects are gastrointestinal, such as vomiting, decreased appetite, diarrhea, and sometimes bleeding. Do not use aspirin in pets that have bleeding ulcers, bleeding disorders, asthma, pregnancy, or kidney failure. Aspirin should be used very cautiously in cats. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Aspirin is a commonly used over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and is used to treat fever, pain, inflammation (swelling), and clotting disorders in humans. Aspirin poisoning occurs when a cat ingests a toxic dose of aspirin, either through misuse or accidentally. Clinical signs depend on how much aspirin was eaten. Treatment for aspirin poisoning depends on how quickly the cat is seen by the veterinarian.

  • Asthma or bronchitis is a fairly common condition affecting cats. It occurs as a result of the airway being hypersensitive to certain stimuli, resulting in airway constriction, excess mucus production, and air trapping. Diagnostics include a physical exam, blood tests, x-rays, bronchoscopy, and bronchial or tracheal lavage. As asthma cannot be cured, treatment is aimed at the management of the disease using a combination of steroids and bronchodilators. Adjunct treatments include modifying the environment to reduce exposure to the noxious stimulus, hypoallergenic diet trials, and acupuncture.

  • If your cat has been diagnosed with feline asthma, it is important that you follow the treatment instructions that have been determined specifically for your cat. This handout is to be filled in by your veterinary team.

  • The word ataxia means incoordination within the nervous system. There are several different forms of ataxia, depending upon where in the nervous system the abnormality occurs. The most common sign of ataxia, regardless of the cause, is an abnormal gait in which the cat is very unsteady on her feet. Treatment of ataxia will be influenced by the root cause. Pain management, supportive care, and creating a safe environment (e.g., preventing access to stairs) are cornerstones of ataxia treatment.

  • Atenolol is used off label and given by mouth to treat certain heart conditions in dogs, cats, and ferrets. Common side effects include tiredness and stomach upset. Contraindications include hypersensitivity to beta-blockers, heart failure, heart block, low heart rate, or certain lung disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • This handout summarizes atlantoaxial (AA) luxation, a condition in which instability or excessive movement is present between the first two vertebrae within the neck. Atlantoaxial luxation can be caused by trauma, hereditary factors, or a combination of these two factors. The most common sign of AA luxation is neck pain, though severely affected dogs may lose their ability to breathe due to paralysis of the diaphragm.

  • This handout discusses atopic dermatitis (atopy), a form of allergic skin disease brought on by an abnormal response to allergens in the environment. The clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment are outlined.

  • Atovaquone is given by mouth and is used off-label to treat protozoal infections. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset or skin rash. Do not use in pets that are pregnant. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.



Vet Services
We provide a wide variety of veterinary services to assist you and your pet. Learn more about the services we offer and how we're different.





Rehab & Fitness Center
Greenfield Animal Hospital is proud to announce that our new small animal rehabilitation and fitness center is now open! This is a brand new state of the art facility houses numerous modalities.





Pet Salon & Spa
Utilizing part of the upstairs building, Greenfield Animal Hospital added on a full time Salon & Spa Grooming services in the Fall of 2012, to further provide all in one experience for you and your pet!